New Health Book Summary Announcement – 20 Things You Need to Know About Holy Basil

From: HealthBookSummaries [mailto:support@healthbooksummaries.com]
Sent: Thursday, May 13, 2010 12:56 PM
To: jag.girl@comcast.net
Subject: New Health Book Summary Annoucement – 20 Things You Need to Know About Holy Basil

HBSLogo-405x105.gif

Basil-Soil-Hands.jpg

20 Things You Need to Know About Holy Basil

Popular in Ayurveda, Hinduism, and for its use in essential oils and Thai cuisine, Holy basil (or tulsi) is a native to the Old World tropics and is cultivated throughout the world. Used in medicinal healing for thousands of years, this aromatic plant is worshipped by Vaishnavite devotees and is used in remedies for various disorders, from the common cold to malaria. Read on to learn the many interesting properties and facts about this very useful plant.

1. Adaptogens have been used to aid meditation and deliver nutrients to the mind that are necessary for the experience of enlivened consciousness. They can be used as aids to elevate the mood and spirit and to calm the mind. The following adaptogens have been used to enhance the mind-body-spirit connection: Asian ginseng, holy basil, licorice, reishi, and shatavari.

– David Winston, RH(AHG), and Steven Maimes, Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief

2. Holy basil also protects against radiation-induced damage in animals that are receiving radiation therapy. A formula of holy basil and vasa leaves (Adbatoda vasica) is used for animals with coughs and colds.

– David Winston, RH (AHG), and Steven Maimes, Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief

3. Preliminary studies indicate that holy basil might enhance CYP-450 activity, thus speeding up the elimination of some medications. There have been many animal studies indicating that holy basil has anti-stress and immunomodulating activity. However, there have not been any human studies confirming this.

– David Winston, RH (AHG), and Steven Maimes, Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief

4. The whole holy basil plant is used by farmers for animals with inflammation of the tongue, ulcers, pneumonia, constipation, liver flukes, opacity of the cornea and sore eyes (the fresh juice is squeezed into the animal’s eye), rapid heartbeat, and sprains. The leaves are used for cows and sheep with coughs, colds, udder infections, and for wound healing.

– David Winston, RH (AHG), and Steven Maimes, Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief

5. A decoction made from the [holy basil] root is used to lower malarial fevers, and a poultice made from the fresh roots and leaves is applied to bites and stings from wasps, bees, mosquitoes, ants, and other insects as well as leeches.

– David Winston, RH (AHG), and Steven Maimes, Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief

6. Holy basil affects the body’s "energy field" according to ayurvedic physician and author Dr. Vasant Lad. Ayurvedic tradition says that holy basil performs the indispensable spiritual function of balancing and toning the energetic chakra system. Holy basil opens the heart and the mind, bestowing the energy of love and devotion (bhakti). Sacred to Vishnu and Krishna, it strengthens faith, compassion and clarity.

– David Winston, RH (AHG), and Steven Maimes, Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief

7. Basil is pungent, heating, balances K and V, and unbalances P if taken in excess. Basil is said to open the heart and mind to the Divine. There are a variety of basil plants. The most famous basil is called tulsi, or holy basil, in India. There it is said to have an association with Lord Vishnu that dates back to Vedic times. Holy basil juice is said to be a longevity drink. Good for all seasons, but less in the summer.

– Gabriel Cousens, M.D., Conscious Eating

8. Holy basil [is] widely cultivated for daily use. There are at least three types of holy basil. The green-leafed variety sri or rama tulsi is the most common. The second type, Krishna tulsi, bears dark-green to purple leaves; this variety has a stronger taste and smell. The third type, vana tulsi, is a green-leafed forest variety that often grows wild.

– David Winston, RH(AHG), and Steven Maimes, Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief

9. Tulsi is the name for Sacred or Holy basil in India and translates to "incomparable one." Native to India, Tulsi has been revered for over 5,000 years, and as Yash Rai in his book Tulsi says, "The Hindu scriptures enjoin us to look upon Tulsi not as a mere plant, but as the divine representative of the God Vishnu or of Lord Krishna." In other texts Tulsi is described as a consort of Krishna, leading to the name "Mother of the Universe." Because of the divine nature of Sacred basil, the plant itself is worshipped both in the morning and at night by leaving a lamp burning at its base.

– Pam Montgomery, Plant Spirit Healing: A Guide to Working with Plant Consciousness

10. Tulsi means "matchless," and the herb has very important medicinal properties – notably its ability to reduce blood sugar levels. In Indian herbal medicine, holy basil has a wide range of uses, relieving fevers, bronchitis, asthma, stress, and canker sores."

– Andrew Chevallier, The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants

11. Though related to common basil, holy basil (Ocimum sanctum) is a different species. Animal experiments have found that its leaves can reduce fasting and post meal glucose levels. An Indian study of 17 diabetics found that 1 gram of holy basil leaf reduced fasting glucose levels by 20.8 percent. In addition, cholesterol levels went down by 11 percent and triglyceride by 16 percent. If you have needed an excuse to use less salt and pepper and to increase your use of more flavorful culinary herbs and spices, consider their glucose-lowering properties.

– Jack Challem, Burton Berkson, Melissa Diane Smith, Syndrome X: The Complete Nutritional Program to Prevent and Reverse Insulin Resistance

12. Holy basil (Ocimum sanctum) is used to improve digestion, relieve flatulence, and reduce allergic response. It is used to treat animals with diabetes when combined with dang shen, jiaogulan, and licorice.

– David Winston, RH (AHG), and Steven Maimes, Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief

13. Ocimum sanctum, otherwise known as holy basil, contains phytonutrients that have "significant COX-2 inhibitory effect." The phytonutrient "ursolic acid" is specifically recognized for its COX-2 inhibitory effects. In research conducted at the Dartmouth Medical School, a study confirmed that derivatives of oleanolic acid and ursolic acid possessed potential anti-inflammatory and cancer-preventing activity related to their inhibition of COX-2.

– Thomas M. Newmark and Paul Schulick, BEYOND ASPIRIN Nature’s Answer To Arthritis, Cancer & Alzheimer’s Disease

14. Holy basil appears to lower stress and cortisol levels. A Thai derivative is known as bai gkaprow.

– Phyllis A. Balch, CNC, Prescription for Nutritional Healing, 4th Edition: A Practical A-to-Z Reference to Drug-Free Remedies Using Vitamins, Minerals, Herbs & Food Supplements

15. Holy basil is rarely used fresh but mostly cooked to release the flavours (as an ingredient of fish, poultry and meat dishes), [to be] used in small amounts only.

– Ben-Erik van Wyk, Food Plants of the World: An illustrated guide

16. Tulsi Tea: Pour 8 ounces hot water over 1 teaspoon dried holy basil leaf (or Tea bag). Infuse (covered) for 3 or more minutes.

– David Winston, RH (AHG), and Steven Maimes, Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief

17. Zyflamend’s pharmacopoeia of herbs includes the following: Holy basil (Ocimum sanctum) has demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory effects in animal studies. It inhibits the formation of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids made from arachidonic acid by the action of COX and LO enzymes. It contains ursolic acid, a known inhibitor of COX-2, and many other antioxidant, anti-inflammatory substances, including eugenol, rosmarinic acid and apigenin.

– Freedom Press, Natural Cancer Cures: The Definitive Guide to Using Dietary Supplements to Fight and Prevent Cancer

18. Holy basil: where there’s stress, there should be holy basil. We need as much balance in life as possible, and holy basil helps.

– Thomas M. Newmark and Paul Schulick, BEYOND ASPIRIN Nature’s Answer To Arthritis, Cancer & Alzheimer’s Disease

19. In Indian folk medicine, the leaves of the holy basil plant are brewed in a tea that is used as an expectorant to treat people with excessive bronchial mucus and bronchitis. The tea also is used for people with upset stomach, biliouness, and vomiting. The powdered/dried leaves have been used as a snuff for nasal congestion, and the juice of the fresh leaf is put in the ear for earaches.

– David Winston, RH (AHG), and Steven Maimes, Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief

20. There have been contradictory animal studies showing that holy basil might be toxic to embryos. Until conclusive information exists, avoid using it during pregnancy. Holy basil also is reported to have an anti-fertility effect and should be avoided if a woman is trying to get pregnant.

– David Winston, RH (AHG), and Steven Maimes, Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina, and Stress Relief

From Our Sponsors

Health Book Summaries is a free service to you, because of our sponsors…please take a few minutes to visit our sponsors and take a look at their special offers for Health Book Summaries Readers:

Tell a Friend About Health Book Summaries

Please be sure to tell a friend about this service so they too can read hundreds of pages of great health information in a fraction of the time!

When you tell a friend, you’ll receive a gift from us: A downloadable copy of the book by Mike Adams, "Natural Appetite Suppressants" which reveals the top nutritional supplements and dietary strategies that help control appetite.

Here’s where you can go to tell a friend now…

http://www.HealthBookSummaries.com/tellafriend.html

Summaries Most Recently Released:

FightforYourHealth_100.jpgReverseHeartDiseaseNow_100.jpgGreenforLife_100.jpgBiologyofBelief-BruceLipton_100.jpgSellingSickness-MoynihanCassels_100.jpgTheSunfoodDiet-DavidWolfe_100.jpg

Summaries Coming Soon…

Here is a sneak peak at a few books that we’ll be summarizing in the next few months!

SpiritualNutrition-GabrielCousens_100.jpgExposed-MarkSchapiro_100.jpg

Here’s what some subscribers are saying about Health Book Summaries…

"Wow!! I love it. I’ve already read my first summary. Thank you so much for doing this…"
– Bernadette Celi, HealthBookSummaries.com Member

"You and Mike have really hit on a super idea. Thanks for taking the initiative to help us all become better informed and hopefully much healthier!"
– Joyce Wiatroski, HealthBookSummaries.com Member

"When I was a child, my cousin and I used to ride our bikes miles to the local book stores to review new and used books. Often I would read nearly a third of a book before deciding if I wanted to buy it. This has never been possible on the Internet until now. Mike Adams and Kevin Gianni have now developed HealthBookSummaries.com so that you can deeply review any health books that interest you for FREE — just like the old days at the book store. Not only can you learn a tremendous amount very quickly by browsing these summaries, you can also decide if you want to have each book in your personal library. What a great service!"
– David Wolfe, author of The Sunfood Diet Success System, Amazing Grace, Eating For Beauty, and Naked Chocolate, founder of Sunfood.com, TheBestDayEver.com, and the non-profit ftpf.org

Please stay tuned for our next announcement!

To Your Health,
Mike Adams, Kevin Gianni and the HBS Team

PS. Your summary is waiting for you! Go ahead and download it now…

http://www.HealthBookSummaries.com/Browse.asp?Member=PDF

PSS.We’re looking for natural health and like-minded business owners. If you own a health business and would like to see your ads appear in our summaries, please contact us today. Learn more at:

http://www.HealthBookSummaries.com/Advertise.html

Share on FacebookShare on Google+Tweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedInPin on PinterestEmail this to someone